Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Hallucinogen Eases Depression in Cancer Patients, Studies Find by JAN HOFFMAN


By JAN HOFFMAN

Two studies used psilocybin to see if the drug could reduce depression and anxiety in cancer patients. The results were striking.

Published: November 30, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Insomniacs Are Helped by Online Therapy, Study Finds by BENEDICT CAREY


By BENEDICT CAREY

The report suggests that many garden-variety insomniacs could benefit from cognitive behavior therapy without ever having to talk to a therapist.

Published: November 29, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Monday, November 28, 2016

Why Gunshot Victims Have Reason to Like the Affordable Care Act by SARAH VARNEY


By SARAH VARNEY

The expansion of state Medicaid programs under the health care law has brought coverage, and necessary treatment, to previously uninsured shooting victims.

Published: November 27, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Summer Project Turns Into Leukemia Testing Breakthrough by DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.


By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

What began as a student effort at a lab in Seattle produced a test for chronic myeloid leukemia that works with a few spots of dried blood on a paper card.

Published: November 27, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Local Transmission of Zika Reported in Texas by DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.


By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

The patient is a woman who is not pregnant and lives in Brownsville, on the Gulf Coast near the Mexican border.

Published: November 27, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Why Do I Gain Weight When I Exercise? by GRETCHEN REYNOLDS


By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS

Starting to exercise often means we eat more and move less than we did before.

Published: November 27, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Sunday, November 27, 2016

Cancer Survivor Receives First Penis Transplant in the United States by DENISE GRADY


By DENISE GRADY

A Massachusetts man who had lost his penis to cancer underwent the operation as part of a program that ultimately aims to help combat veterans.

Published: May 16, 2016 at 08:00PM

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Friday, November 25, 2016

Many in Florida Count on Obama’s Health Law, Even Amid Talk of Its Demise by ABBY GOODNOUGH


By ABBY GOODNOUGH

In a state that Donald J. Trump won, many do not believe he will end a benefit they rely on, posing a challenge for those seeking to scrap the program.

Published: November 24, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Thursday, November 24, 2016

Why Handwriting Is Still Essential in the Keyboard Age by PERRI KLASS, M.D.


By PERRI KLASS, M.D.

It is more than just a motor skill, researchers say. It engages the mind.

Published: June 19, 2016 at 08:00PM

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Personality Change May Be Early Sign of Dementia, Experts Say by PAM BELLUCK


By PAM BELLUCK

Researchers have proposed new diagnosis, mild behavioral impairment, along with a 34-question checklist to identify people at greater risk for Alzheimer’s.

Published: July 25, 2016 at 08:00PM

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Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Eli Lilly’s Experimental Alzheimer’s Drug Failed in Large Trial by PAM BELLUCK


By PAM BELLUCK

The drug maker said the drug, solanezumab, had not helped patients with mild symptoms of the disease, a result that may affect prospects for similar tests underway.

Published: November 22, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Microcephaly Found in Babies of Zika-Infected Mothers Months After Birth by PAM BELLUCK


By PAM BELLUCK

A study published Tuesday found that some babies who did not have unusually small heads when they were born still developed microcephaly months later.

Published: November 21, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Monday, November 21, 2016

Telling Mosquitoes Apart With a Cellphone by DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.


By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

Calling their project “Shazam for Mosquitoes,” Stanford students showed that common mobile phones could distinguish the hums of beating wings, which could prove useful in fighting diseases.

Published: November 20, 2016 at 07:00PM

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A Drama Free Thanksgiving

The Holiday season is in full swing, and we’re kicking off with Thanksgiving next week. Holiday movies and commercials always paint Thanksgiving as a time of immense joy, where families come together to laugh, sing, and dine in perfect harmony. But sometimes it feels like it doesn’t quite work out for your Thanksgiving fĂȘte. That’s because no family is perfect. Our expectations are already set by cultural norms of what the holidays should be and not what they actually are.

So, in the spirit of a happy holiday season, let’s revisit this awesome article by writer Addie Broyles, filled with tips on keeping a level head during a particularly noisy time of the year.

Keep a healthy relationship with food

No one is ever going to argue that food isn’t the best part of Thanksgiving. But if you’re going into a high-stress environment, make sure you aren’t loading up your plate to make yourself feel better. That isn’t to say that the spread isn’t meant to be enjoyed, but if you find yourself going overboard make sure it isn’t a reaction to a disliked relative or unpleasant feeling.

Be aware of what makes you upset

Before you even begin the feast, it may do you well to address some stressors before hand. Maybe you’re starting to get upset about your end of year finances as the travel costs and gift shopping expenses begin to tally up. Others may suffer from seasonal affective disorder, and suffer from a melancholic mood during the waning days of autumn. If your feelings are taking a turn for the worse, consider going outside for some fresh air— or a jog if you can manage it! Release some of those feel-good endorphins to give you a boost before the pending holiday party.

Have a comeback ready

Do you have a relative you just know is bound to say something that offends the sensibilities of many a person at the table? Every year you clash on politics or religion, and the ensuing argument seems to bring down the vibe for everyone. Instead of taking the bait, consider working on a reply ahead of time. Take the high road away from an argument, and dismiss any negative comments with your canned answer.

Get some alone time

If you’ve done everything in your power to avoid dinnertime drama and you’re still feeling on edge, realize that there is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a breather and removing yourself from the equation entirely. If you’re in a familiar place like your or a parent’s home, Broyles suggest soaking down with a bath. You could also go for a post-dinner walk, or retreat to your childhood bedroom for a meditation session.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

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Palo Alto High Schools Step Up Mental Health Efforts

Late last year, the Atlantic’s Hanna Rosin wrote a feature detailing “suicide clusters” at two Palo Alto High Schools. These brilliant students, though performing exceptionally in the classroom, suffered from poor attention to mental health. The wealthy and elite town nestled in Silicon Valley is home to a troubling teen suicide statistic, and at Palo Alto High in particular, 12% of students seriously contemplated suicide in the 2013-14 school year.

Her piece was widely shared, and saw almost 1000 comments that sparked debate on teenagers, mental health, and what we expect of students. Are we asking them to do too much? Is this a terrible consequence of the pursuit of perfection? The fact that these students are maturing in an environment that is also home to what so much of the world considers to be the finest, brightest, and most successful entrepreneurs cannot be easy either. It’s a ton of pressure.

School officials and administrators have begun to take actionable steps to address these problems. The biggest obstacle? Destigmatizing mental health treatment. A recent article from PRI’s The World shares some of the efforts that Palo Alto Unified School District has made to take better care of its students. The most prominent of these are wellness centers that have combined resources with medical services. At Palo Alto HIgh School, they share a building on campus. Now, going to the nurse’s office with an upset stomach will take you to the same place as a trained mental health professional.

The centers, which were modeled after similar wellness centers in Australia, have proven to be successful. In a seven-week period this fall, nearly a third of the district’s 3,800 students visit wellness centers a total of 4,200 times. And it’s not just kids these professionals are helping— they’re providing a valuable resource to parents by presenting them with conflict management strategies that help them better communicate with their teen.

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U.S. Dementia Rates Are Dropping Even as Population Ages by GINA KOLATA


By GINA KOLATA

Despite fears that dementia rates were going to explode as the population grows older, a large study of Americans has found the opposite.

Published: November 20, 2016 at 07:00PM

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Saturday, November 19, 2016

Lifting Lighter Weights Can Be Just as Effective as Heavy Ones by GRETCHEN REYNOLDS


By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS

In a study, participants’ muscles got bigger and stronger whether they lifted heavy or light weights — as long as they lifted until they were tired.

Published: July 19, 2016 at 08:00PM

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Share Your Story about Being a College Student with Autism by THE NEW YORK TIMES


By THE NEW YORK TIMES

Have you or a family member received a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder and attended college? If so, we would like to learn more about your experiences.

Published: November 18, 2016 at 07:00PM

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